Black Soldier Fly larvae: an intro to these wonder composters!

guest Posts: 24,389
edited March 2012 in Organics
[center]c-ray is gonna LOVE THIS! :nod:


Hermetia illucens:

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Apples...ummm:

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I like watermelons too...and so do stinky, stanky buds!:

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I've been researching "Black Solider Flies" ("Hermetia illucens"; aka "Phoenix Worms") in larvae form as a means of composting very similar to vermiculture. The Black Solider Fly (BSF) larvae are raised in a very similar fashion to worms but with a few distinct differences. The "castings" from BSF larvae contain exotic enzymes, proteins, lipids, etc. These castings are said to be very beneficial for plants after a period of decomposition or when feed to worms and the resulting worm castings are used.

An important thing to note is that BSF larvae castings are not stabilized or fully digested/broken down (as are worm castings). Within the BSF larvae "castings" will be fully broken down BSF larvae "poop", enzymes, bacteria, fungi, partially decomposed food stuffs (from the enzymes, microorganisms, etc) and partially consumed food stuffs (from the BSF). Before BSF larvae castings can used they should be feed to a worm bin, bokashi bin or buried to decompose for further beak-down and stabilization...don't feed BSF castings directly to plants.

BSF larvae like to eat everything, including aged animal manure, meat, fish, dairy products, fruits, veggies, citrus, onions and milk products. It would be wise to feed them the [URL="https://www.cannabis-world.org/cw/showpost.php?p=66823&postcount=14"]"worm fattener" i posted, along with bokashi, [URL="https://www.cannabis-world.org/cw/showpost.php?p=62024&postcount=2"]protozoa hey (not a lot and not very wet), bokashi compost (the middle picked stage) and the regular kitchen waste food stuffs.

BSF larvae like it on the warm side, about 80 degrees and humid too...but more on that when I post a how-to on building a BSF larvae compost bin for 15.00!..."Gojo BSF Larvae Palace" (GLP) ;) The only one on the market is $150.00! www.thebiopot.com. The BSF compost bin I'm making is easy as crap to make, I'll do a "BSF larvae compost along" thread where I'll start the thread when I start the bin...one thing to know is it's a pain to get the BSF larvae castings from the thriving colony inside the bin.

why am i ranting about BSF?

They can digest more food stuffs at faster rate than worms can**. BSF does not need the food stuffs to be put through a food processor, BSF larvae can eat it as is. The food stuffs destined for worm bins should be put through a food processor because worms have little mouths and rely on bacteria, enzymes to break down food for their consumption, which all require more surface area of food stuffs. That's the great thing about BSF larvae, they eat so fast they are done by the time the worms are ready to eat the BSF larvae castings! It's works almost too well. BSF larvae can live fine in the same bin with worms but the BSF larvae tend to push the worms around and even make the worms retreat to the bottom of the bin!
**BSF larvae castings is not fully broken down

I am going to feed the BSF larvae castings to the worms and the resulting worm castings should be crazy :loco: ! I imagine the castings will be full of a very wide array of bacteria, fungi, enzymes, BM and EM not found anywhere else.
[center]Im going to feed the BSF larvae and the worms the following (pretty much):
picked stage bokashi compost
kitchen scraps {fruits/veggies} (no onion, garlic, citrus)
carrot pulp
wet dog food
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Links:
1. [URL="http://www.happydranch.com/invertebrates/soldierfly.html"]What is a BSF larvae anyway?
2. [URL="http://www.esrint.com/pages/bioconversion.html"]Great in depth but easy to read info, example of BSF larvae bin
3. [URL="http://www.thebiopod.com/pages/resources.html"]Finding/attracting/harvesting BSF
4. [URL="http://www.phoenixworm.com/servlet/StoreFront"]Purchase BSF larvae "starter colony"...or call your local reptile/pet shop and ask for Phoenix Worms.
5. [URL="http://www.aquaponicshq.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2483#post2483"]A must read thread by the "Gary"; very interesting!
6. [URL="http://www.pondboss.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=100832&fpart=1"]Great long thread about rasing BSF larvae again by Gary
7. [URL="http://www.thebiopod.com/forum/"]BSF forum (hosted by makers of the biopod)
8. [URL="http://blacksoldierfly.blogspot.com/"]BSF Blog
9. [URL=""]YouTube video of live large BSF larvae and pupae (I think do to their size)

[center]Quotes[/center]

Castings:
"The castings produced by BSF larvae are said to retain up to 50% of their original protein levels so they are perfect for worm bedding..."

"...Keep in mind that the quantity of castings versus food scraps is quite small. For every 100 lbs of kitchen waste added, you only obtain approx. 5 lbs of bsf castings.

...The castings are somewhat dry and very friable - they are dark in color, and could be bagged and sold as a soil amendment. My suggestion would be to use them as food for your vermiculture system."

Benefits to vermiculture:
"One of the drawbacks of raising redworms is the speed at which food scraps are processed into castings. Before the worms can begin their feast, it is necessary for the beneficial micro-organisms to begin breaking down the scraps - redworms do not eat fresh foods, only ones that are decomposing. This can take a great deal of time, especially on new setups. The surface to volume ratio is also a factor that affects the rate of digestion. The smaller the particle size, the faster the decomposition. Most organic kitchen waste is not ground up sufficiently to maximize decay, and thus the transformation into casting can be painfully slow.

BSF larvae are notably different that redworms because they will actively consume fresh scraps immediately, without the need for pre-decomposition. BSF digestion is focused on the proteins and fats in the waste pile - most of the cellulosic materials do not get eaten by the larvae, though physical chopping into smaller pieces does occur. The remaining cellulose fraction is targeted quickly by fungi and composting bacteria at the lower levels of the pile. The black, friable residue that remains after digestion by the larvae is of ideal consistency, particle size and nutrient balance to be fed directly to an active vermiculture system. The end result of this two-tiered processing is the production of redworm castings at a faster rate than using redworms alone."

Misc:
"In view of the wide variability of putrescent waste presented to it, this benign creature possesses one of the most robust digestive systems within nature. It has the ability to thrive in the presence of salts, alcohols, ammonia and a variety of food toxins. In addition to food waste, it can also process swine, human and poultry waste. Upon reaching maturity, this creature is rigidly regimented by evolution to migrate out of the unit and into a collection bucket without any human or mechanical intervention. This self-harvesting grub represents a bundle of nutrients that rivals in commercial value the finest fish meal. In our effort to dispose of food waste, why waste this valuable resource? Why not boldly insist upon the reintegration into the feed chain of most of the nutrients and energy it contains?"

Texas experiment:
In an experiment conducted in Texas over a period of one year, ESR LLC determined that SF larvae can digest over 15 kilograms per day of restaurant food waste per square meter of feeding surface area, or roughly 3 lbs per square foot per day. A 95% reduction in the weight and volume of this waste was also noted. This means that for every 100 lbs of restaurant food waste deposited into a unit, only 5 lbs of a black, friable residue remain!

The moment waste is deposited into the unit, the larvae begin to secrete powerful digestive enzymes into the waste long before it begins to rot and smell. Since thermophilic and anaerobic bacteria play no part in this process, these tiny creatures are able to conserve and recycle most of the nutrients and energy within the waste.

Naturally find BSF:
The first method is to begin a colony naturally, using a 1-2 day supply of mixed kitchen scraps and the native population of black soldier flies (BSF) in your locale, which serve as the progenitors. Gravid females can detect and are attracted to very low levels of food scrap odors - they lay their eggs in close proximity to the food, and babies hatch out in about 100 hours. Juvenile grubs grow quickly and are quite visible within a few days time. The average time it takes to start a colony by this approach is roughly 2 weeks, depending on the native concentration of BSF in your region. A functionally mature colony that begins to show signs of grub crawl off and intense digestion of food scraps, takes about 30 days to establish.


Defeat other files:
Before your BSF colony becomes established, mitigation of other fly species can be accomplished by a technique referred to as the 'lasagna method'. With the initial BioPod
Post edited by Unknown User on

Comments

  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    Oh, yea! I forgot to mention that there is about 1000 BSF larvae on their way to me :D

    One concern:

    When transferring the BSF larvae castings there is danger of also transferring some BSF larvae into the worm bin. While this isn't a big deal it can mess with your worms eating habits a good deal.

    I'm thinking of adding a limited about of food to the BSF larvae bin so they will eat it all and then stop reproducing. After the last few larvae pupate and climb the rail the castings should be pretty much larvae free. The worms will eat the BSF larvae eggs if they are present. BSF larvae don't like direct light so as a last step you could lightly sift through the BSF castings with a flashlight...any larvae will be obvious and you can pick them out.

    I was also thinking it might be good to add some of the BSF larvae castings to the bokashi bins.
  • caddiscaddis fish food Posts: 974
    edited March 2008
    Nice gojo! Just curious, what are you marketing the bokashi as? Is it just for compost making or are you also marketing it as a feed additive for yard birds etc...

    Take care, and thanks for sharing the great projects.
    “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” JFK
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    edited March 2008
    cool udaman gojosan ...now I need to find a source in Canada (phoenix worms at the pet store eh)

    do I need to get the large ones (3/4") or will the small ones grow into large ones...more worms for le$$ if I buy the small ones

    ...also will I need a separate bin for the BSFs or can they intermingle with the red wigglers?
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    caddis;69416 said:
    Nice gojo! Just curious, what are you marketing the bokashi as?
    Plant uses:
    soil additive (adds life to soil and breaks-down organic matter)
    compost starter (for regular compost piles)
    compost agent (in bokashi systems)
    worm food
    BSF larvae food
    aerated compost tea "starter"** (brewed alone for 48 hours adds fungi/mico base; this is important for a equal mix of fungi, bacteria, enzymes and mico in the final tea.)

    **To brew tea with high fungi count:
    You can use wheat or oat bran, it doesn't need to be bokahsi. Add a couple of hands fulls of bran to porus bag in 5 gallon pail of h2o and bubble for 6 hours, then remove bag of bran and continue bubbling for 24-40 more hours. After this time period add your regular tea ingredients and make you tea as usual.)

    Farm use:
    (if using for feed make bokashi with rice bran; wheat causes allergies in many animals)
    live stock and poultry feed
    deodorization (spread over what smells to reduce odor; ie. manure piles)

    House use:
    (if using for feed make bokashi with rice bran; wheat causes allergies in many animals)
    pet food additive
    cat litter box deoderizer
    spetic system cleaner (down the tolit)
    caddis" said:
    Take care, and thanks for sharing the great projects.
    Thanks, you too. and you welcome! :D
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    c-ray;69418 said:
    cool udaman gojosan ...now I need to find a source in Canada (phoenix worms at the pet store eh)
    yup!
    c-ray said:
    do I need to get the large ones (3/4") or will the small ones grow into large ones...more worms for le$$ if I buy the small ones
    I would get a mix of small and medium, not large. The young ones are just hatched and the big ones are more mature and closer to pupation. Keep in mind that most BSF larvae are pre-feed before you get them so they may not eat right away. This is why small/medium is better for use as composters, given a few days to digest they will be ready to devour new food stuffs. Large ones may pupate before they eat a lot of food stuffs so it's kind of a waste as a starter colony.

    To keep your colony alive you should collect of half dozen larvae from the "harvest trap" and keep them till they gestate into flies. Then re-introduce the files into the colony so they will lay more eggs. Don't worry about loosing them, BSF flies are crappy fliers!

    You can make a BSF larvae compost bin from a 5 gallon pail pretty easily. The only trick is making the railing so they can self-harvest.
    ...also will I need a separate bin for the BSFs or can they intermingle with the red wigglers?
    You should have separate BSF and worm bins. BSF prefer fats, proteins, oils and BSF will crowd out the worms. The BSF won't hurt the worms but the worms may stop eating and retreat to the bottom of the bin. In nature BSF and worms live together but they have enough room where they can move away from one another.
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    i'll do a thread with pics showing how to make a BSF larvae bin by wendsday or so this week.
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    c-ray;69418 said:
    cool udaman gojosan ...now I need to find a source in Canada (phoenix worms at the pet store eh)
    I think your in BC but here's two options in Canada you might be able to use if you can't find any at your local pet/reptile shop:
    Ontario: http://www.recorp.ca/
    Alberta: http://www.bugorder.com/

    good luck!
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    Interesting~!!

    Phoenix Worm Store:

    *Yes, we really do live on a farm but our worms are reared on an enriched grain-based diet in an environmentally controlled sanitary environment. No wild insects were gathered to produce this premium product.
    hummm...grain-based huh?...sounds like a good portion of the food stuffs could be bokashi! :clap: The added benifit here is the bokashi will help pickle food stuffs the BSF larvae don't digest.

    P.S. "enriched" refers to calcium i believe, Ca is important for reptiles.
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    edited March 2008
    it's a great concept, I think I will wait until spring to order so I can keep them outside still a little on the cold side

    this is another source in canada
    http://www.canadianfeeders.com/
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited March 2008
    it's a great concept, I think I will wait until spring to order so I can keep them outside still a little on the cold side
    True...or you could keep um inside next to your worm bins like im gonna do. You can make a escape-proof BSF bin for like 15.00 and in like an hour. BSF bins are just like worm bins, they don't smell, they don't attract other files, etc.

    :D
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited April 2008
    nice! I got my BSF larvae, I bought them from my local pet shop :D :D

    I'm building a BSF compost bin tonight to test my ideas and designs. Fortunilty I ran into someone who also raises BSF larvae for composting at my local farmers market. He invited me over to check out his BSF larvae and biopod! word! :dig:

    I went to his house and I was throughly disappointed by the biopod, it's a joke. It doesn't even have drainage holes for the BSF larvae compost sludge. His biopod was outside so there were very few BSF larvae but I got a real good look at the biopod. Because there aren't drainage holes the compost sludge just putrefies, it smelled pretty bad. Hell, even he didn't like it for that reason...he drilled big holes on the sides near the very bottom but the compost sludge is thick and viscus; it did not flow through the holes.

    The best part is that I got to pick his brain about raising BSF (he's been doing it for a year now). You know what he does with all his BSF compost sludge? Puts it right into his worm bins...he says they LOVE IT. Also intersting is that only BSF larvae eat, pee and shit. Adult BSF don't consume food and they don't fly very well. This is why BSF aren't a health issue (like black files), BSF flies don't excrete waste.

    I think I've got a good design for a better and much cheaper BSF larvae compost bin. When I have tested my prototype I'll post a how-to.

    My new friends...all 1000 of them, the other packs are out of view. I purchased the small ones but I'd like to have the extra small and medium too; but the pet shop was out of stock...
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  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    [CENTER]...2nd try...[/CENTER]

    OK, well my first try with BSF didn't go so well. I think it was a combination of my not spending enough time and the BSF larvae themselves were not very active when I bought them.


    So i went over a friends house who is testing the biopod and he had a HUGE collony of BSF in his biopod...holy shit! Those things can destroy a serious amount of food, I never seen anything like it. They where eating and moving around so much they were generating there own heat.

    He just filled his biopod 1/2 way with kale and left it outside to rot and attract the BSF. THe BSF larvae out compete fruit flies and other bugs/larvae so they just really take over the bins. I couldn't believe how many BSF larvae were in his bin. And there were a ton of BSF eggs on the outside of the bin.

    Man those things stink! It's not a rancid smell but it's a dark, moist, earthy, foul musk type of smell...that's the smell they emit when you've got thousands of them. There were oranges he put in yesterday and they were FULL of BSF larvae, I mean full; they were oozing out of it. They will eat anything, meat, fish, dary, fruits, veggies, dead bodies, (kidding, sort of ;) ), etc, etc.

    I am really quite amazed at how much food stuffs they can eat. But, as I've mentioned the BSF larvae lachate is very vicious and will drain out of the bin; there is a lot of the muck. It will also collect in the bottom of the bin as a thick layer of more vicious/muddy like consistency, similar to very moist EWC. THe BSF larvae castings and leachate are not fully digested, they need further processing before they are used in an ACT for example. The BSF castings and leachate are 95% broken down but still need further breakdown (eg. in the worms digestive tract)

    So I plan to collect the BSF larvae leachate and feed it to my worm bins. I also want to figure out how to collect the BSF castings and put them in the worm bin too...but both are moist so i need to dry it out or use a little at a time. THe leachate and casting have a ton of microbes which composting worms utilize and it's 'pre-digested' so the worms can use the food-stuffs too (they usually have to wait for microbes to start breaking down the food stuffs )

    My friend gave me a bunch of BSF larvae with some food stuffs there still eating and some BSF castings in the mix too. They are in a 1/2 gallon plastic container and there are prolly like a 600-1000 of them and they are all super active...it's crazy the container is actually warm to the touch from all the heat they are creating by moving around, eating and the food stuffs decomposing.

    I'm also thinking about just burying the BSF castings with bokashi and maybe some alfalfa, rice and oat meals to help 'dry' the castings and add there own benifits...and then let it sit for a few months...

    Anyway, I feed my worm bins Bokashi pickled-stage food stuffs (green yard/kitchen waste, vegies and fruits) so the addition within the worm of the BSF castings and leachate should be very useful in creating a VERY microbial rich EWC...:up: :farm:...wish me luck...I'll keep you all updated...

    P.S. (c-ray, et al)
    I'm also toying with the idea of making some AEM with the BSF leachate/castings...:chin:
  • purplehaze2 Senior Member Posts: 839
    edited July 2008
    you never stop GOJO,I like how you work,so basically you use those bsf worms instead of earth worms because they eat more goods . when you say castings is that a shell that they shed or is that what they shit out. and when you put the larva inn they just eat and grow, the kids need to come over your house for holloweeen {yea reach your hand in there blind folded} heheh .
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    Hey PH2,

    earthworm castings are the crap of a worm

    BSF castings are the crap, liquids and not-fully digested food stuffs of the BSF larvae

    I am going to use the BSF castings as a food source for the worms, then the worm castings will be used in ACT, etc. BSF castings are 95% digested and full of microbes...exactly what the worms want! Worms don't eat the food stuffs cuz' they are hungry, they eat food stuffs cuz' they want to get the microbes on/in the food stuffs...microbes are the worms real diet, the food stuff put into the bin is a means to an end.

    When you place food in the BSF bin the BSF larvae will consume the food until they are of age and size to pupate. At that point they will crawl away from the food, somewhere above the food and find a little nook to pupate within. Once they pupate and become files they don't have mouths and don't eat or shit so they are not health risk. Once they are files they find somewhere to lay eggs close to a food source...then they die. Once the eggs hatch the larvae will crawl to the food stuffs.

    But, I've had my larvae in a 2 little bottle for a week and I've been feeding them a few bannanas and a few apples a day and keep them covered with shredded newspaper. There seems to be A LOT more BSF larvae then when I first got them last week. But thats not supposed to be possible cuz' they havnet' pupated..maybe it's that they are growing and are more visable, I'm not sure.

    The funny thing is when I stated working with BSF composting there was only a few other ppl anywhere doing the same thing. Now, there are more ppl messing with BSF composting but there is not body of knowledge regarding composting with BSF...so me and few ppl I know are trying to figure this stuff out. ONe of the more difficult issues is composting inside with BSF while allowing them to pupate and lay eggs all in a contained manner...

    That I know of only myself, that guy I know and maybe 10-15 other ppl in the US are working with BSF composting. In Oz and New Zealand it's a bit more popular but still there are very few ppl experimenting with BSF composting. The BSF castings are not ready for use by plants so it has to be processed by worms, time, bokashi, etc, etc...

    HTH
  • purplehaze2 Senior Member Posts: 839
    edited July 2008
    man gojo IM really starting to get this,thats awesome your stepping it up a notch or 2 with BSF ,man this act stuff is really cool because you can add it to seedlings tomatos hydro,everything loves it and you make it your self. I made my duelys own tea brewer thats the cheap and easy way and very effective like you were saying. I have a bunch of hydro bucket inserts the red ones with holes in them already drilled ,I think I have 8 of them. Can I make a worm bends out of them by staking them ? The bottom bucket is sopposed to not have any holes in it am I correct. I live in a clay infested area were for some reason earth worms go crazy there everywere,if you put a garbage can down and let it sit for a day theres like 20 earthworms right underneth it. And by the way there is no more hydro in my garden,its all soiless.you were dead on about the bail,I was only 1 plant short on my soiless. I took all the hydro shit out,and man you can really pack it in there compared to the hydro. Im starting to see the lite! And youve been a big factor for my success so far. thanks a lot.
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    Hey all,

    Thought you'd like to see the current state of my BSF testing. After this post I'm do a little write-up on a how-to...

    So heres we go:
    • First two pis are pis of BSF, they are little and at the 11 o'clock position.


    • Next 4 pics are of my bin w/the larvae...there's got to be thousands in there! THey sure LOVE the wet dog food!!!


    • Last pics are of my bin in next post
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  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    and here the pics of my bin:

    "Gojo-Pod" not a "Bio-Pod"...lol...suckers!

    In the orange bucket is the lachate after 48 hours and a few larger larvae that somehow got down there.

    I really think that the BSF larvae lachate is SO dirty that it, along with prepared egg yolk and maybe autolyzed yeast extract is the way to culture PnSB!

    :)
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  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    Hey all,

    well I wanted to try collecting my own BSF and oh my fuc*ing gawd! It was way too easy and kind fun too...

    So two days ago I built my BSF bin...screw the bio-pod!

    My unit cost me $15.00 including all parts and food stuffs. Two days ago I made it and I already have thousands of BSF larvae! Screw paying hundreds and hundreds of dollars for a bio-pod!


    Parts:
    • (1) 5 gallon bucket
      Drill a TON of 1/8" or 1/4" holes into the bottom, you want a LOT of holes


    • (1) 5 gallon bucket lid
      Drill a bunch of 1/4" holes into the lid so the BSF can lay eggs and the larvae can crawl into the buckets. Make sure to put in covered place or if it's gonna rain or put a lid without holes on the bucket...you don't want rain getting into the bucket.


    • (1) 5 gallon bucket
      This is the bottom one and catches the lacheate and dead/old larvae


    • Window screen
      Cut it to fit into the bottom of the bucket with holes in it, then place within bucket


    • Food stuffs (proteins, fats, sugar, etc)
      1 can of wet dog food, carrots, beets, kale

    So what I did was put the bucket w/holes into the bucket w/out holes and then layed the screen in and finally put the food stuffs on top of the screen. Then I put a lid on top which is broken so it'll allow BSF and larvae to access the buckets. I then took the bucket and put in a spot that is always shady in my back yard and left it alone for a few days...

    I put the bucket within the bucket to allow the leachate to drain away. BSF larvae make a TON of leachate as they eat. The leachate needs to be drained away and I want to use it to culture PnSB ;) . Anyway, the Bio-Pods big problem is that there are NO drain holes...LOL! So the bio-pod just collects all the crap and it sits there until someone removes all the BSF and then washes it out...what a bunch of BS, the bio-pod is a joke!


    Self Harvesting:
    As I mentioned the BSF larvae will self-harvest after they are big enough and want to pupate. But the wisdom is that they need a ramp less than 35 degrees leading to the lid of the bin. They crawl up the ramp and find a place to pupate into a BSF. The resulting BSF then flies around the bin and lays eggs on any little nook or overhang which is close to the bucket. When the larvae hatch they will smell the food stuffs and crawl to it...then eat and grow until they want to pupate...over and over again is they cycle.

    Here lies the interesting part: The BSF larvae are crawling ALL OVER my bucket. I mean on every side from top to bottom and on the bottom of the lid! So if they can stick and crawl up a vertical incline right now why the hell do I need to build a 35 degree ramp? I think there is some misinformation out there by companies who want to make use of BSF. So I think there is no need for a ramp, but well see. In about a week or two some larvae should start to pupate and then see I'll if they can crawl up the vertical wall and pupate on the lid...I think they will!
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    Interested???

    If anyone wants to play with BSF and is having trouble rasing your own I can send you a bunch. Don't buy them, they are VERY expensive for what you get and they aren't active at all...it's like there dead. The reason is that they are for food and they don't want them moving around like mad when somethings trying to eat them...

    So just hit me with a PM or let me know if you've got my email and I'll try to get um out soon as possible. I would like to see other ppl here working with BSF. It's so new there is no knowledge base for it, esp in horticulture and use with vermicomposting and PnSB culture. I am the only one working with them in this regard that I know of. Other ppl and companies are working with them but not really for horticulture...so I could use some help!!! LOL

    Being the only one is lonely...come one and join me!


    P.S. Check out the whole carrots and beets! Try that with worms, lol. Anyway, those veggies had gone rotten in my fridge so I just threw um' in the bucket :farm:
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited July 2008
    [B]and here's a neat one I like:[/B]


    hahaha...look at that frogs stomach, so full of BSF larvae! Looks like he's gonna pop from eating all the BSFL that fell/crawled out of that guys homemade BSF compost bin :nod:
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  • DOZEEDOZEE Herb-Smith Posts: 1,609
    edited August 2009
    Interesting shit. do you have to keep it from the house? do thay swarm the area if unchecked?
    **DISCLAIMER: I am not currently, nor have I ever grown, smoked, or even seen real marijuana. All of the pictures posted here by me are not my own and I would never think of breaking any law of the United States, no matter how antiquated or stupid.**
  • guest Posts: 24,389
    edited August 2009
    Hey bro,

    Check your PMs :)

    You want to keep it away from the cuz of the smell, not swarming. BSF, once pupated, will only fly a few inches off the ground. They don't eat or crap once they pupate so there's no issue of that...but damn do they smell when there is lots of them.

    I am composting lots latly and I had about 300 pounds of wet spent brewers grains which the BSF covered in like four days when it was hot out...ruined the whole lot of WSBG :(

    I have not much in the way of BSF larve culture, but I still plan to when I have more room to keep them further from the house...stinks like strong musk!
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    edited February 2010
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    edited March 2012
    bsf biopod forum:
    http://thebiopod.com/forum
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732


    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    wow

    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,732
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
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