EM (Effective Microorganisms) and Bokashi

c-rayc-ray germinatingPosts: 14,823
edited October 2012 in Organics
Post edited by c-ray on
"One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
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Comments

  • SpringsSprings Fall Posts: 1,203
    edited November 2006
    Yum! Effective Microorganisms! I just activated a few litres of EM.

    I used a little stronger than recommended ratio of 1:1:20 and went with 1:1:10

    1:1:10 being EM:mollasis:water

    Now I incubate for a few weeks untill the ph drops to sufficiant levels, then they're ready to use!

    Im going to bath tonght in a few left over ml of the mother culture I didnt activate.

    peace

    Read up on EM!
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    " Forgiveness is divine, but never pay full price for late pizza."
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited November 2006
    good show
    I hope your molasses is the unsulfured type
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • SpringsSprings Fall Posts: 1,203
    edited December 2006
    I hope so too!
    I tested out my small bottle, ph seems to bounce between 3.4 - 3.8,
    so ive been using it with positive results. Drinking it, bathing in it, cleaning with it, and of course using it in my garden.

    Really makes me wish I had a microscope, Ill have to ask around, would be cool to see pics!
    " Forgiveness is divine, but never pay full price for late pizza."
  • ParabolaParabola lex injusta non est lex Posts: 1,072
    edited December 2006
    hey Springs,

    just wondering if you find it can be used to lower ph in a res or in the medium?
    [SIGPIC]https://www.cannabis-world.org/cw/picture.php?albumid=40&pictureid=341[/SIGPIC]

    "The man who craves disciples and wants followers is always more or less of a charlatan. The man of genuine worth and insight wants to be himself; and he wants others to be themselves, also." ~ Elbert Hubbard
  • SpringsSprings Fall Posts: 1,203
    edited December 2006
    The ammount added to my water barely changed it. As for the action of the microorganisms Im not to sure.
    " Forgiveness is divine, but never pay full price for late pizza."
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited December 2006
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited December 2006
    from http://www.ceps.com.tw/ec/ecjnlarticleView.aspx?atliid=386615&issueiid=29190&jnliid=1164
    Microbial Inoculants as Effective Microorganisms (EM) were applied to find out their effects on germination and seedling growth of Albizia saman in the nursery. The seedlings were grown in a mixture of sandy soils and cow dung (3:1) kept in polybags. The EM solution at different concentrations (0.1%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% and 10%) was incorporated before and after a week of sowing seeds. Germination and physical growth parameters, including shoot and root length, vigor index, collar diameter, leaf number, fresh and dry weight of shoot and root and total biomass increment over the control were measured. The nodulation status influenced by EM was also observed along with the estimation of chemical parameters like chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid. Both germination and the measured physical growth parameters were found significantly (P<0.05) higher in seedlings treated with different concentrations of EM solution in comparison to the control. Maximum growth was found at 2% followed by 1% EM solution. Nodulation was higher at 0.1% concentration but it normally decreased with the increase of concentrations. Although there were a higher amount of pigments in leaves of the treated seedlings than of the control, the variations recorded with respect to chlorophyll a, b and carotenoid were not significantly higher in most of the treatments. Treated seedlings showed variable results along with the increment of EM applications and most of the parameters showed best results at the medium range of concentrations. The study indicates that the Microbial Inoculant (EM) technology might be useful to improve the growth of seedlings in the nursery. This also indicates that the associated beneficial organisms along with the polybag soils might be of value in improving the degraded soil or poor field soil for better nutrient and water uptake during the initial growth of transplanted seedlings.</div>
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited December 2006
    from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&amp;_udi=B6V24-4GMGW7R-1&amp;_coverDate=05/31/2006&amp;_alid=510585366&amp;_rdoc=1&amp;_fmt=&amp;_orig=search&amp;_qd=1&amp;_cdi=5692&amp;_sort=d&amp;view=c&amp;_acct=C000050221&amp;_version=1&amp;_urlVersion=0&amp;_userid=10&amp;md5=2965bdae3fab449fce32e733651cee0d
    Abdul Khaliqa, M. Kaleem Abbasia,

    University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Department of Agronomy & Soil Science Faculty of Agriculture, Rawalakot Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan
    Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan

    Received 23 January 2004; revised 25 April 2005; accepted 3 May 2005. Available online 14 July 2005.


    Abstract

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effects of integrated use of organic and inorganic nutrient sources with effective microorganisms on growth and yield of cotton. Treatments included: control; organic materials (OM); effective microorganisms (EM); OM + EM; mineral NPK (170:85:60 kg); 1/2 mineral NPK + EM; 1/2 mineral NPK + OM + EM and mineral NPK + OM + EM. OM and EM alone did not increase the yield and yield attributing components significantly but integrated use of both resulted in a 44% increase over control. Application of NPK in combination with OM and EM resulted in the highest seed cotton yield (2470 kg ha−1). Integrated use of OM + EM with 1/2 mineral NPK yielded 2091 kg ha−1, similar to the yield (2165 kg ha−1) obtained from full recommended NPK, indicating that this combination can substitute for 85 kg N ha−1. Combination of both N sources with EM also increased the concentrations of NPK in plants. Economic analysis suggested the use of 1/2 mineral NPK with EM + OM saves the mineral N fertilizer by almost 50% compared to a system with only mineral NPK application. This study indicated that application of EM increased the efficiency of both organic and mineral nutrient sources but alone was ineffective in increasing yield.
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited March 2007
    that's what happens when you post stuff in the middle of the night ;)


    from http://www.emtechnologynetwork.org/~en/_web/library/leaflets/emBokashi/emBokashiRecipe.html

    [QUOTE][B]RECIPE - making 50 pounds of EM
    Composting102103w800.jpg
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    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • dpndpn Senior Member Posts: 723
    edited March 2007
    so you basically just dilute the freshly brewed EM with water and then feed your plants? http://www.emproducts.co.uk/EM-A.htm going to get myself one of these for my bday next week, let the brewing begin :cool:
    I do not particularly like the word "work." Human beings are the
    only animals who have to work, and I think this is the most ridiculous
    thing in the world. Other animals make their livings by living, but people
    work like crazy, thinking that they have to in order to stay alive. The
    bigger the job, the greater the challenge, the more wonderful they think it
    is. It would be good to give up that way of thinking and live an easy,
    comfortable life with plenty of free time.
    Masanobu fukuoka
  • The CannarchistThe Cannarchist Super Moderator Posts: 3,357
    edited March 2007
    Happy B-day for next week dpn.

    How much are those puppies?
    Trailer trash hippie redreck
  • dpndpn Senior Member Posts: 723
    edited March 2007
    I do not particularly like the word "work." Human beings are the
    only animals who have to work, and I think this is the most ridiculous
    thing in the world. Other animals make their livings by living, but people
    work like crazy, thinking that they have to in order to stay alive. The
    bigger the job, the greater the challenge, the more wonderful they think it
    is. It would be good to give up that way of thinking and live an easy,
    comfortable life with plenty of free time.
    Masanobu fukuoka
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited March 2007
    I just stash it above the water heater while it's brewing
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited April 2007
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • dpndpn Senior Member Posts: 723
    edited April 2007
    I do not particularly like the word "work." Human beings are the
    only animals who have to work, and I think this is the most ridiculous
    thing in the world. Other animals make their livings by living, but people
    work like crazy, thinking that they have to in order to stay alive. The
    bigger the job, the greater the challenge, the more wonderful they think it
    is. It would be good to give up that way of thinking and live an easy,
    comfortable life with plenty of free time.
    Masanobu fukuoka
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited April 2007
    from http://www.lindros.co.za/EM_derivatives.htm

    [QUOTE]EM-FPE (Fermented Plant Extract)

    Bioactive supplement of vitamins, hormones and enzymes. FPE prevents pests & disease of the plants and soil, too. The cost of making FPE can be very cheap if you use weeds, but using herbs will improve its quality and is then similar to EM Insecticide (Isseki-Sancho or 3-in-1).


    How to make EM-FPE:

    Materials
    • 3 % good quality Multi EM
    • 3 % pure liquid cane molasses
    • Clean water
      [LIST]
    • Borehole drinking water
    • City water: containers with city water need to be left open in the sun for up to a day to get rid of the chlorine before being used.
    [/LIST]
    [LIST]
    [*]Container full of fresh weeds, herbs and other plant matter. When choosing appropriate plants the Japanese say use
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • caddiscaddis fish food Posts: 974
    edited April 2007
    6 month storage has my attention, thanks monsta, keep up the kung fu.
    “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” JFK
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    from http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1515484
    Abstract

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effects of applications of an organic fertilizer (bokashi), and chicken manure as well as inoculation of a microbial inoculant (commercial name, EM) to bokashi and chicken manure on photosynthesis and fruit yield and quality of tomato plants. EM inoculation to both bokashi and chicken manure increased photosynthesis, fruit yield of tomato plants. Concentrations of sugars and organic acids were higher in fruit of plants fertilized with bokashi than in fruit of other treatments. Vitamin C concentration was higher in fruit from chicken manure and bokashi plots than in those from chemical fertilizer plots. EM inoculation increased vitamin C concentration in fruit from all fertilization treatments. It is concluded that both fruit quality and yield could be significantly increased by EM inoculation to the organic fertilizers and application directly to the soil.
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • dpndpn Senior Member Posts: 723
    edited May 2007
    could honey be used instead of molasses? if desired...
    I do not particularly like the word "work." Human beings are the
    only animals who have to work, and I think this is the most ridiculous
    thing in the world. Other animals make their livings by living, but people
    work like crazy, thinking that they have to in order to stay alive. The
    bigger the job, the greater the challenge, the more wonderful they think it
    is. It would be good to give up that way of thinking and live an easy,
    comfortable life with plenty of free time.
    Masanobu fukuoka
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    no not really, honey is anti-microbial
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • crazy cootercrazy cooter Occasional Visitor Posts: 94
    edited May 2007
    C-ray, this stuff is fascinating. Have you been implementing it for a while now? If so, what are your impressions? Of not only the science but the results and the process?

    Thanks!
    10001110101
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    I've played with it for a few years but just starting to get a good feel for it now

    I've mixed 1:1:20 (em/mollasses/water) with various raw materials and it breaks things down amazingly fast...and it is a composting process that conserves nutrients, compared to regular thermophilic composting which will always result in a significant loss of nitrogen

    I am doing a little test right now where I took some culled males about 10 days ago and cut them up roots and all and saturated it with some AEM (activated EM), the thinking here is that these males were in their prime veg mode just at the point of sexing so I am going to let it ferment for a few weeks and then blend it up and feed some plants with it, and compare to other clones of the same variety that did not get the treatment...if I get a chance I will try mixing some of that into the soil of a few plants and see what happens
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    here's another thing...if I was buying off the shelf organics in a bottle I would add like 40ml of EM and 40ml of molasses per bottle and let it sit in a warm place

    the home brew ferts I am making with EM smell awesome, they smell edible in fact...a lot of the off the shelf organics in a bottle smell downright horrid, which is a bad sign, considering how nice real compost smells
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • dpndpn Senior Member Posts: 723
    edited May 2007
    like earth juice lol... ive been making teas with freshly food processed comfrey and nettle leaves with some home made ej catalyst (kelp, molasses, wheat malt, wheat bran, yeast). The nettles make the tea get foamy real quick... im buying some em soon.
    I do not particularly like the word "work." Human beings are the
    only animals who have to work, and I think this is the most ridiculous
    thing in the world. Other animals make their livings by living, but people
    work like crazy, thinking that they have to in order to stay alive. The
    bigger the job, the greater the challenge, the more wonderful they think it
    is. It would be good to give up that way of thinking and live an easy,
    comfortable life with plenty of free time.
    Masanobu fukuoka
  • crazy cootercrazy cooter Occasional Visitor Posts: 94
    edited May 2007
    c-ray;57178 said:
    I've played with it for a few years but just starting to get a good feel for it now

    I've mixed 1:1:20 (em/mollasses/water) with various raw materials and it breaks things down amazingly fast...and it is a composting process that conserves nutrients, compared to regular thermophilic composting which will always result in a significant loss of nitrogen

    I am doing a little test right now where I took some culled males about 10 days ago and cut them up roots and all and saturated it with some AEM (activated EM), the thinking here is that these males were in their prime veg mode just at the point of sexing so I am going to let it ferment for a few weeks and then blend it up and feed some plants with it, and compare to other clones of the same variety that did not get the treatment...if I get a chance I will try mixing some of that into the soil of a few plants and see what happens
    Sounds really interesting, C. I'll check in now and again to see how it's going for you and read up... thanks for all the wonderful links and info!
    10001110101
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    :peace:
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    from http://www.odemagazine.com/article.php?aID=3665
    Little organisms, big revolution

    It's hard to believe, but lactic acid bacteria, fungi and yeasts could help solve the world's environmental and food problems. In the right combination - and without chemical additives - they create bigger harvests and higher profits. Increasing numbers of tropical countries are reaping the rewards in areas such as agriculture, fishing and cattle-farming. Marco Visscher travelled through Thailand and examined the possibilities of a potential panacea.

    Look, Kajornvit Yongyut has put it all down on paper. Fifteen years ago he was producing 200 kilos of mushrooms daily. For the past seven years production has increased by 25 percent, sometimes even reaching 300 kilos a day. The farm hasn't changed, nor has its surface area, and he isn't using more than the usual seven bags of compost to fertilise his mushrooms each day. How can this be?
    Yongyut can't wait to explain. 'EM', short for 'effective micro-organisms', he says as if describing a magic potion. Yongyut sits back triumphantly, looking briefly disappointed that his visitor from Europe already knew the answer.

    He quickly recovers and jumps up, heading for the barn. Here, racks hold thousands of 'beds' containing sawdust from rubber trees, mixed with a cocktail containing lime and gypsum, ripening until the mushrooms can be picked. This is the barn where for years Yongyut sprayed chemicals, sometimes several times a day. The poison was meant to eradicate flies and other insects, which rarely disappeared completely. All those years the heavy smell of chemicals hung in the air. Yongyut suffered from skin problems and had difficulty breathing.

    Then, seven years ago, Yongyut heard about EM, which he began spraying in the barn daily. Since then, his yields have increased. He no longer needs the chemicals and his skin problems have cleared up. And what do you know, not a fly in sight.

    EM is the rather dull name for a technological breakthrough, which has the potential to spectacularly impact the agriculture, horticulture, fishing and cattle-farming industries, not to mention waste processing, natural forest management and water purification. EM is a mixture of micro-organisms, including lactic acid bacteria, fungi and yeasts. When these organisms are present in the soil, they stimulate productivity and vitality. They purify the water and air present in the soil and excrete nutrients. The result: an excellent environment for plants and animals.

    Teruo Higa, a horticulture professor from the University of Ryukyus in Japan, discovered EM, which he claimed significantly increased production levels. Rice fields in Japan produced 50 percent higher yields in the first year. Cucumber cultivators, which normally produce one cucumber per stalk, were able to produce four to five per stalk. The same was true for corn, with reports from some growers of up to eight ears per stalk. The most successful and remarkable example is cherry tomatoes, with yields increasing fourteen fold from 30 to 300 tomatoes per plant. EM is now being used in 116 countries: from Nepal to Canada, from China to Brazil, from Kenya to the Netherlands. The method is used most intensively in Thailand, Japan and North Korea, where EM technology has been applied on a broad scale for a myriad of reasons.

    While discussing EM over a meal, Somsak Hemtanont hesitates. Tough question. 'Yes, EM can save the world,' he says thoughtfully, adding resolutely: 'but first Thailand.' The district head of Dankunthod puts down his fork. 'It is good for production, health and the environment. If all countries used EM, we could indeed cleanse the whole world, but it is already a massive undertaking to get things in order in Thailand.'

    Hemtanont also knows that it is a political choice not all governments support. 'We opt for EM because in the conventional agriculture and fishing industries chemicals are used that are damaging for the health of our people. They suffer from skin and bronchial problems, they get cancer and end up in hospital. It simply costs the government a great deal of money to treat these people. Using EM makes chemicals superfluous, which means we save on health care costs.'

    Hemtanont quickly stabs another jumbo shrimp with his fork. Shortly, a delegation from Venezuela will be waiting to meet with him. There is significant interest in EM from abroad, even in this district where some five percent of agricultural production is generated using EM - somewhat less than the estimated national average. If the current project, spread over 20 villages, is successful EM use will no doubt increase substantially next year when other farmers start to use the technology. Cost is not an obstacle. In fact, EM costs around half the price of chemicals and chemical fertiliser. 'Farmers are used to chemicals,' Hemtanont explains. 'They don't easily believe there is a natural alternative; otherwise they would have heard of it, right? They are only convinced when they see how quickly the effects of EM become visible, especially in the peppercorns.' He sticks up his little finger: 'This is the size of a conventional peppercorn. Using EM it is this size', he says, using his index finger.

    Finally, fresh air. After leaving Bangkok's ubiquitous exhaust fumes just one hour ago, it is a relief to arrive at the place where the first large-scale experiment with EM began. This Kyusei Nature Farming Center is an area in Saraburi covering 70 hectares. Here, self-sufficiency is put into practice. All kinds of crops - including rice, tomatoes, mango, papaya, bananas and aubergine - are cultivated here with the help of EM.

    'There is nowhere else in the world where the effects of long-term use of EM are so clearly visible.' And Somlaksana Pongdit should know. She has been working in the centre for eight years and is now the director of EMRO, Thailand's EM research centre. 'I've seen the fruits and vegetables grown here change. Every year harvest yields increase and so do the profits, especially compared to other fields in the area.'

    Few things are simpler than working with EM, which is also added to fertiliser. Shimoji Takashi, EMRO's Japanese representative, has joined us for the demonstration. You take a container with water, throw in a dash of EM and a couple of spoonfuls of molasses or brown sugar using a ratio of 90:5:5. 'The micro-organisms in EM are dormant,' Takashi explains as we watch. 'So they have to come to life, become activated. Just like people actually. You need water and food to be able to function.' The fluid mixture can be spread over the soil (one litre per 100 square metres, five times each growing season) to increase fertility. It can also be used in compost to ensure the energy in the organic material is not lost, as is the case with conventional compost.

    There is also an alternative, EM Bokashi, named after the Japanese word for 'fermented organic material'. It is made by mixing organic waste (such as rice bran, fishmeal, straw, chicken fertiliser) with EM and a great deal of water. Bokashi is used to increase the microbial diversity of the soil. Takashi explains: 'There are three types of micro-organisms in the soil: degenerative that are harmful to humans, animals and the environment, regenerative that are beneficial and a whole array of neutral organisms. The neutral variety, which account for 80 to 90 percent of all micro-organisms, tend to take on the characteristics of the dominant type. Therefore, if the soil contains mainly degenerative micro-organisms, the neutral ones will also slowly become harmful. This is the case when pesticides are used frequently, which disturbs the balance in the microflora. But EM creates an environment in which the regenerative micro-organisms multiply, prompting the neutral ones to do the same. This is the reason why the long-term use of EM leads to increasingly better results.'

    The cattle farming industry faces major environmental problems, including stench and water pollution. In Europe, strict regulations make it difficult for farmers to stay in business, but the rules in Thailand are not so rigid and pollution is also more prevalent. EM can provide a solution for cattle farmers. The penetrating stench of cattle farms is mainly due to ammonia, hydrogen sulphide and trimethylamine, which feed the micro-organisms present in EM ands cause the stench to disappear. Keeping stalls clean using a diluted EM solution can prevent surface and groundwater pollution. Combined with the cattle manure, the odourless fluid from the cattle stalls can even produce high-quality organic fertiliser that can be spread over the land.

    Somchart Amornwattanawong, a veterinarian in Wat Huai Prab, is only too aware of the advantages of EM. In his region he visits a lot of farms where animals such as ostriches are bred for slaughter. But he's never had as little work as at the farm of Pada Sirmosnavey, who for the past year has been raising ostriches flown in from South Africa, with the help of EM. Sirmosnavey has 110 ostriches, making him one of the largest ostrich breeders in his country.

    'These ostriches rarely suffer from worms or parasites', Amornwattanawong noticed. 'They grow faster, as they are less susceptible to illness and diarrhoea. Because they are healthier as a result, they are also more lively and active. Their feathers are prettier and shinier. I've never seen anything like it.'

    What counts for Sirmosnavey are the lower costs. And they are not insubstantial. Because he adds EM to the animals' drinking water and feed, their excellent health means he no longer needs to buy chemicals and antibiotics. An added advantage: 'They need less feed to maintain the same weight.' He will slaughter his ostriches in six months time. Only then will it become apparent whether they are tastier. Sirmosnavey suspects this will be the case. 'My ostriches will be more tender and tasty. I'm sure of it.'

    Perhaps the greatest EM success story comes from Chachoengsao, a province located further inland. We drive through an area where countless shrimp farmers live and work. The shrimp mature in artificial ponds measuring around 40 square metres. But shrimp farming has a bad reputation. Or, more accurately, a bad smell. The high concentration of chemicals produces a penetrating odour in the water, which the farmers must brave nonetheless when they wade through it to harvest the shrimp.

    But in this part of Chachoengsao there's no trace of such stench, mainly thanks to Tinakorn Tongkaew. He was the first shrimp farmer in the area to convert to EM seven years ago. At that time he had incurred a huge debt to the company that supplied the pesticides he added to the water and antibiotics he put in the food. The chemicals not only ravaged his wallet, but his health. When he went into the water, the poison pricked at his skin. He also discovered that the quality of the water deteriorated the longer he used chemicals and that the poorer the quality, the more chemicals he needed. He became trapped in a vicious circle along with many other shrimp farmers.
    In a desperate attempt to build a better future with his wife, Tongkaew completely stopped using chemicals. His cousin told him of his positive experience with EM, and he made the shift. Despite his debt, he was able to borrow money from the bank to put in three new ponds. He was forced to close down the existing ponds because of the stench and his production dropped to a dramatically low level. Tongkaew scattered EM Bokashi at the bottom of his ponds and mixed EM in with the animal feed. Since then production has increased dramatically each year.

    Somewhat timidly Tongkaew sums up the differences, as if he can't quite believe it either: 'I can harvest more often, sometimes up to three times a year, while previously I only had one or two harvests. Far fewer shrimp are dying prematurely, which means I can yield the same harvest while purchasing fewer shrimp. Now they have a shiny shell and no longer smell after I catch them.'

    Tongkaew led a turnaround in this region and potentially in an entire industry. Thailand's government stimulates its fishing sector to use EM, including the recent introduction of an organic certificate awarded to EM shrimp. For now, however, the certificate system is not applied to exported shrimp, the theory being that there would be no demand for organic shrimp. So EM and traditional shrimp continue to be lumped together on supermarket shelves, indistinguishable from one another. But for Tonkaew's fellow shrimp farmers in his region one real gain has already been realised. The regional bank that extends loans to shrimp farmers has one condition: they must use EM or they get no money.

    For more information: www.emtech.org and www.emro.jp/english.
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    another brand of EM, from denmark -> http://biosa.dk/engelsk/index_uk.html
    this is a variation of EM that's fermented with several herbs
    from what I understand the 3 products vitabiosa, terrabiosa, vitabiosa and animalbiosa are the same liquid but with different labels

    this is available in canada from http://www.greatday.ca and http://vitabiosa.com

    [QUOTE]Vita Biosa

    Organic Herb drink fermented with lactic acid cultures

    Vita Biosa is taken as a natural drink in quantities from a teaspoonful up to 100 ml. Usually 10 ml are recommended, once to three times daily. Most people will benefit by taking it with meals. However, it can also be taken between meals. Drink either undiluted or mixed in water as a juice. For children over 1 year a daily dosage of 5 to 10 ml is recommended.

    Fermentation – a natural process

    Vita Biosa is a mixture of aromatic herbs [1] and other plants, which are fermented by a special combination of lactic acid and yeast cultures [2] (see Datasheet ). Lactic acid bacteria are a group of related bacteria that produce lactic acid as a result of carbohydrate fermentation. The production of lactic acid gives a low pH value of about 3.5. The low pH prevents the development of harmful bacteria in the finished product. Vita Biosa contains no sugar – as the lactic acid bacteria have fermented the sugar, making it suitable for diabetics.

    Vita Biosa - a living product
    Vita Biosa is a living product, formed through natural processes. Because of this the colour and taste of Vita Biosa varies between productions. Vita Biosa is still “alive” when bottled and will, like wine, alter its flavour with increasing time and after the bottle has been opened. Vita Biosa can produce carbon dioxide, making an increased pressure in the bottle and a sparkling effect.

    Storage and keeping qualities
    Before opening there are no special requirements but we recommend that Vita Biosa is stored in a dark place at a constant temperature. Overpressure can arise above 18C
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • c-rayc-ray germinating Posts: 14,823
    edited May 2007
    from http://biosa.dk/engelsk/Produkter/Terra Biosa/household_and_garden.htm

    [QUOTE]Terra Biosa Garden

    For the Garden

    ______________________________________________________________

    Terra Biosa Garden is a soil improver , based on a GMO free organic herb mixture, which has been fermented with a special blend of naturally occurring micro organisms. The main purpose for using terra Biosa Garden is to decompose organic material and to strengthen the plant's health.

    Terra Biosa Garden creates better growing conditions for the plants through increasing the activity and the population of the soil improving bacteria. The visible effect of Terra Biosa Garden is the enlarged root system, which increases the absorption of the important nutrients.

    Terra Biosa Garden is available in a 3 litre bag-in-box.


    Benefits
    • Promotes the germination, blooming and ripening of fruits and plants
    • Improves the soil structure, physically, chemically and biologically
    • Increases the crop's ability to photosynthesis
    • Secures a better germination ability and strengthens the plants
    • Improves the manurial value of the organic material
    In the following there are given guidelines for the use of Terra Biosa Garden, but to get the full benefits of Terra Biosa Garden it is important to make own experiences and try out different solutions. the dosage guidelines are based on a healthy soil more or less in balance. it can often be advisable to use double doses during the first 1-2 years. this will quickly balance the micro flora in the soil.


    Application
    • Composting
    • The kitchen garden
    • Flower beds
    • Pot plants
    • Lawns
    • Fruit trees
    • Green houses
    • Seeds


    Composting

    Kitchen refuse, grass and other organic waste can be transformed to nutritious compost. Water the compost heap with a 2% Terra Biosa Garden solution (200 ml Terra Biosa Garden in 10-50 litres of water) approximately every second week or when the heap seems dry. It is important that the heap does not become too wet as the growing conditions for the bacteria that create rotting instead of composting, are promoted under very humid conditions.


    The kitchen garden

    Weeds have an ability to take over the space of the crops that have been sowed. To cut down weeding time, it is a matter of getting the seeds of the weeds to germinate before the crops are sowed. This way, the seedlings are easily removed with a cultivator or a rake. Even with the use of Terra Biosa Garden the weeds cannot be removed completely, but with careful preparations before sowing the crops, the amount of weeds can be reduced considerably so that it becomes easier to keep the beds clean. The applied Terra Biosa Garden helps to decompose the organic material from the weeds that have been raked over.

    Before the soil is prepared, it is watered with a 2% Terra Biosa Garden solution (20 ml Terra Biosa Garden in 10 litres of water). Use a 1 litre solution per square metre. When the soil has been turned the beds are prepared. After one to two weeks the soil is raked thoroughly so that all the germinated weeds are pulled over. This treatment is repeated at least once more. The crops should be sowed immediately after the last raking. The newly sowed seeds are watered with a 0,2% Terra Biosa Garden solution if required.

    Plants require a supply of nutrients during the whole growing season. The soil normally contains a large amount of the necessary nutrients, but they are often bound in combinations that make accessibility difficult or impossible for the plants. Adding Terra Biosa Garden during the growing season, ensures an optimal microclimate in the soil and that the decomposition of the organic material is at its best. If the cultivated crops require a lot of nutrition, as for example with leeks, or if the soil is very poor, it is a good idea to use Bokashi (see below) along with compost.

    The usual treatment with Terra Biosa Garden is to water the plants with a 0,2% Terra Biosa Garden solution (20 ml Terra Biosa Garden in 10 litres of water).Use a 1 litre solution per square metre. The treatment begins two weeks after the plants have germinated and is repeated at an interval of about two weeks, altogether four to six times.

    Bokashi is mixed with compost or is sprinkled in a thin layer onto the soil a few centimetres away from the rows. Bokashi can be added several times during the growing season.


    Pot plants

    Pot plants are watered daily or in the usual routine with a 0,1-0,2% Terra Biosa Garden solution (1-2 ml Terra Biosa Garden in 1 litre of water). This solution can also be sprayed directly onto the plants with an atomizer.


    Lawns

    Lawns can be treated with Terra Biosa Garden. Water with a 5% solution (500 ml Terra Biosa Garden in 10 litres of water). Use a 1 litre solution per square metre approximately every two weeks, altogether four to six times, from early spring. Relatively high concentrations can be applied to lawns, as grass is quite robust and already in growth at this time. Newly sowed lawns should be treated as plants in general.

    Beyond being a playground for children and a beautiful sight, the lawn is an important deposit of nutrients for the other plants in the garden. the fresh cut grass can be transformed into a nutritious "grass-bokashi" within a short time (Terra Biosa Garden fermented grass).


    Grass bokashi

    [list][*]First estimate the weight of the cut grass
    [*]Produce a basic solution of sugarcane molasses, Terra Biosa Garden and water, equivalent to 10% of the weight of the grass (10 litre solution for 100 kg grass). For the basic solution approximately 300 ml sugarcane molasses, 300 ml Terra Biosa Garden and 10 litre warm water (~40
    "One cannot develop taste from what is of average quality but only from the very best."
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
  • SpringsSprings Fall Posts: 1,203
    edited May 2007
    All right, time for the em revolution!
    " Forgiveness is divine, but never pay full price for late pizza."
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